Robin Flanagan  
Home | Course Schedule | Current CV | Works in Progress | Et Cetera

Robin Flanagan

Department of Psychology

Western Connecticut State University

Danbury, CT  06810

 

Education:

Ph.D. in human cognition and learning, Columbia University.  Areas of focus include non-declarative learning, perception and action, and instructional media effects.

M.A. in human cognition and learning, Teachers College, Columbia University. 

B.A. in literature, Bennington College.

Teaching Experience:

Fall, 2006 to present.  Associate professor, department of psychology, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT.  Teaching experimental psychology, cognitive psychology, physiological psychology, and introduction to psychology.

Fall, 2001 to Spring, 2006.  Assistant professor, department of psychology, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT.  Teaching experimental psychology, cognitive psychology, physiological psychology, and introduction to psychology.

Fall, 1997 to Spring, 2001.  Assistant professor, department of psychology, Iona College, New Rochelle, NY.  Teaching statistics, physiological psychology, experimental psychology, general mental health and introduction to psychology.

Spring, 1992 to Spring, 1995.  Teaching assistant for graduate statistics courses at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Fall, 1987 through Fall, 1991.  Adjunct Lecturer in microcomputer courses at Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie, NY.

Fall, 1984 through Summer, 1986.  Conducted corporate training seminars on various aspects of using computers and computer databases, for a wide variety of employees (assembly workers through corporate vice presidents).  J.M. Huber Corporation, Edison, New Jersey.

Other Experience:

Spring, 1989 through Fall, 1992.  Educational design and development of multi-media industrial training software for Edge Technologies, Hoboken, NJ.

Spring, 1982 through Summer, 1986.  Computer Programmer and end-user consultant, J.M. Huber, Corporation, in Edison, NJ.

Papers and Publications:

Flanagan, R. (2010).  The Necessity of Ordinary Experience.  In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (Eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Flanagan, R. and Canada, T. (2010).  “Ordinary experience helps girls develop their spatial reasoning,”  poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science,  May 29, 2010, Boston, MA.

Wilson, M., Flanagan, R., Gurkewitz, R. and Skrip, L (2009) The Effects of Origami Practice on Cognition and Language on Spatial Reasoning. In Robert Lang (Ed.), Origami4 : Fourth International Meeting of  Origami Science, Mathematics and Education. Natick, MA: A.K. Peters, Ltd.

O’Neill, P. and Flanagan, R. (2009). “Research Ethics And On-Line Training: Can Your Computer Teach You To Be Good?” Poster to be presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association. March 6, 2009, Pittsburgh, PA.

Flanagan, R., and Canada, T. (2008). The importance of ordinary experience: providing girls with time for regular practice of mathematical cognition. In B.C. Love, K. McRae, and V. M. Sloutsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Wilson, M., Flanagan, R., Gurkewitz, R., and Skrip, L. (in press). "Understanding the Effect of Origami Practice, Cognition and Language on Spatial Reasoning." Proceedings from the Fourth International Conference on Origami in Science, Mathematics, and Education (4OSME), September 8-10, 2006, Pasadena, California.


Flanagan, R., Gurkewitz, R., Wilson, M., and Skrip, L. (2006).  “Improving Spatial Reasoning Through Experience: Evidence of Priming and Long-Term Effects.”  Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science (formerly American Psychological Society), May 26, 2006, New York, NY.

Damon, A., and Flanagan, R. (2006).  “Analyzing the Perception of Drugs and Alcohol Between Males and Females on the College Population.”  Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science (formerly American Psychological Society), May 27, 2006, New York, NY.

Flanagan, R., Gurkewitz, R.,  and Wilson, M. (2005).  “Improving spatial reasoning through experience:  a pilot study.”  Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Society, May 27, 2005, Los Angeles, CA.

Flanagan, R. (2005).  “Plagiarism and the “File-Share” generation:  helping students to use their own voices.”  Poster presented at the American Psychological Society Teaching Institute, May 26, 2005, Los Angeles, CA.

Flanagan, R. (2004).  “The Future of Learning with (or without) Technology:  Lessons from Cognitive Science.”  Paper presented as part of the WCSU Science at Night Lecture Series, December 2, 2004, Danbury, CT.

Flanagan, R. (2004).  “Learning with Technology.”  Paper presented as part of the WCSU Psychology Department’s Psychology Forum,  October 13, 2004, Danbury, CT.

Lopez, D. and Flanagan, R. (2002).  “Ecological approaches to classroom learning:  Why context matters.”  Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Society, June, 2002, New Orleans, LA.

Khoo, R. and Flanagan, R. (2002).  “Use of Technology in the Teaching of Psychology:  What Do Students Actually Learn?”  Participant Idea Exchange at the Ninth Annual APS Institute on the Teaching of Psychology, June, 2002, New Orleans, LA.

Flanagan, R., and Brennan, C. (2002).  “Cognitive effects of unconscious plagiarism.”  Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Society, June, 2002, New Orleans, LA.

Fazal, M., Flanagan, R., and Goldsby, D. (2001).  “Implementing an assessment program for the impact of technology assisted learning, part 2:  Ensuring accountability.”  Paper presented by the second author at the Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis 2001 Assessment Institute on November 5, 2001, Indianapolis, IN.

Flanagan, R., Fazal, M., Black, J.B., and Goldsby, D. (2001).  “An ecological approach to assessment”, poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Society in Toronto, June 14-17, 2001.

Flanagan, R. and Black, J.B. (2001).  “Effects of learning from interaction with physical or mediated devices,” in Burton, G. and Schmidt, R. (eds.), Studies in Perception and Action VI.  Hillsdale, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Fazal, M., Flanagan, R., and Goldsby, D. (2000).  “Designing an assessment program for the impact of technology assisted learning (TAL): Establishing accountability,” paper presented at the 2000 Assessment Institute in Indianapolis, Nov.6, 2000.

Oswald, P., Flanagan, R., Kim, K., and Zaromatidis, K. (2000).  “Integrating Technology in the Psychology Curriculum:  A Panel Discussion.”  ERIC Digests [U.S. Department of Education] http://www.ed.gov/databases/ERIC_Digests/index/

Flanagan, R. and Black, J.B. (1998).  "Television and Persistence," in K. Swan, Meskill, C. and DeMaio, S. (Eds.) Social Learning from Broadcast Television.  Cresskill, NJ:  Hampton Press, Inc.

Flanagan, R. and Black, J.B. (1997a).  "Direct vs. indirect experience:  A new look at media effects."  Presented as part of a symposium organized by Flanagan and Reed, at the International Congress on Perception and Action, Toronto, July, 1997.

Flanagan, R. and Black, J.B. (1997b).  “Unintended Results of Using Instructional Media, Part II:  Learning from a Computer Simulation.”  ERIC Document No. ED409890.

Flanagan, R. and Black, J.B. (1997c).  “Learning with Technology:  Two Studies that Encourage Caution.”  Paper presented at the Cameron University Festival on Science, Technology, and the 21st Century, in Lawton, OK, March, 1997.

Flanagan, R. (1996).  "Unintended Results of Using Instructional Media:  A Study of Second and Third Graders." ERIC Document No. ED394514.

Flanagan, R. and Black, J.B. (1996).  "Declarative vs. Production Knowledge:  What Third-Graders Learn from Instructional Software," in F.Y. Dore (Ed.) Abstracts of the XXVI International Congress of Psychology, International Journal of Psychology, Vol.31, No.3-4.

Flanagan, R. (1996).  Learning Through Direct vs. Indirect Experience:  The Role of Interactivity and Physicality in Media Effects.  Ann Arbor, MI:  UMI Dissertation Services.

Flanagan, R. and Piccolini, J. (1992).  "The effect of multi-media authoring at the high school level", paper presented at AECT,  Wash., DC, February, 1992.

Flanagan, R. (1988).  “Older Learners and Computers”, in Data Training, Vol.7, No.10.

Affiliations:

American Psychological Association
Association for Psychological Science

Cognitive Science Society

Connecticut Usability Professionals Association

Eastern Psychological Association

website by Push&Shove Design