This website was created by Laura Smolowe for educational purposes only
e-mail: laura.smolowe@yale.edu

Graphics Sources  (by page)

On the Main Page:
1st Pickerel Frog photograph courtesy of the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History
2nd Pickerel Frog photograph courtesy of the Rogue River National Wet Weather Demonstration Project

On the Lifestyle Page:
1st Pickerel Frog photograph by Andy Clay, e-mail: aclay@msms.org
Range Map courtesy of the Rogue River National Wet Weather Demonstration Project
Pickerel Frog with Leopard Frog photograph courtesy of the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History
Pickerel Frog Underbelly photograph courtesy of the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History
Maine Range Map courtesy of the Maine Gap Analysis
Minnesota Range Map courtesy of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources
2nd Pickerel Frog Picture by G.S. Casper, e-mail: gsc@mpm.edu
Pickerel Frog Call Spectrogram courtesy of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History
Maine Breeding Maps courtesy of the Maine Gap Analysis

On the Sources and Links Page:
Pickerel Frog photograph courtesy of the Rogue River National Wet Weather Demonstration Project

Other Sources and useful links:

Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. 1991. A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians, Eastern and Central North America. 3rd Edition. Houghto Mifflin Company. 130-134.
      This guide discusses indentification, distribution, lifestyle and ecology, and the conservation status of Rana palustris .

Klemens, Michael W. 1993. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut. 341-345.
      This survey contains useful habitat and physiology information, as well as a good description of the differences between Rana palustris and Rana pipiens.

Wright, Albert Hazen. 1914. North American Anura. Life histories of the Anura of Ithaca, New York. Carnegie Inst. Washington Publ. (197): vii+98 p.
      This source includes good detailed information about the Pickerel Frog's egg, egg masses, and tadpole.

Zweifel, Richard G., Ed. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles. 1971. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles. 117.1.
      This catalogue is an excellent source, containing the detailed taxonomy of Rana palustris as well as an extensive bibliography.

Wisconsin Sea Grant.
      This site provides general information about the Pickerel Frog and some anecdotes such as how this frog got its name.

Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History: Nova Scotia Frogs.
      This link contains excellent information about the lifestyle of the Pickerel Frog, especially its breeding and eating habits.

Great Lakes.
      This site offers a fun opportunity to listen to recordings of various frog calls, including that of the Pickerel Frog.

UCONN Natural History Museum: Connecticut Frogs.
      This site contains general information about Connecticut herps, and detailed information about the calling of Pickerel Frogs.

Amphibians of Maine.
      This site contains excellent information about the breeding habits of the Pickerel Frog.

Amphibians of Ontario.
      This site offers excellent habitat related information and a recording of the Pickerel Frog's call.

Cleveland Museum of Natural History: Frogs and Toads of Ohio.
      This site contains useful information about breeding and habitat, and includes a detailed description and recording of the Pickerel Frog's call.

Toads and Frogs of Minnesota.
      This site makes clear the differences between the summer and winter habitats of the Pickerel Frog.

the Rogue River National Wet Weather Demonstration Project.
      This site has general information about habitat and conservation and many fabulous photographs.

Cortland Herpetology Connection.
      This is a very useful site as it provides a list, with photographs, of all the Anurans (frogs and toads) in New York. This list is sorted by family, and includes both the common and scientific names of these animals.

Other Literature related to the Pickerel Frog:

Babbit, Lewis H. 1937. The amphibia of Connecticut. Bull. Connecticut State Geol. Nat. Hist. Surv. (57) :1-50.

Bailey, Reeve M. 1944. Iowa's Frogs and Toads. Iowa Conservationist 3(3-4):17-20, 25, 27-30.

Bleakney, J. Sherman. 1958. A zoogeographical study of the amphibians and reptiles of eastern Canada. Bull. Natl. Mus. Canada (155):1-119.

Brown, Jack S., and Herbert T. Boscung, Jr. 1954. Rana palustris in Alabama. Copeia 1954 (3):226

Dickerson, Mary C. 1906. The frog book. Doubleday, Page and Co., New York. xvii+253 p. (Reprinted in 1969 bt Dover Publ. Co.).

Hardy, Jerry D., Jr. 1964. A New Frog, Rana palustris mansuetii, susp. nov. from the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Chesapeake Sci. 5(1-2):91-100.

Harlan, Richard. 1826. Descriptions of several new species of Batracian reptiles, with observations on the larvae of frogs. Amer. J. Sci. Arts 10(1) :53-65.

Leconte, John. 1825. Remarks on the American species of the genera Hyla and Rana. New York Ann. Lyc. Nat. Hist. 1(2) :278-282.

Mecham, John S. New information from experimental crosses on genetic relationships within the species group. J. Exp. Zool. 170(2):169-180.

Moore, John A. 1946. Hybridization between Rana palustris and different geographical forms of Rana pipiens. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 32(7):209-212.

Mulcare, Donald J. 1965. The problem of toxicity in Rana palustris. Proc. Indiana Acad. Sci. 75:319-324.

Schaaf, Raymond T., Jr., and Philip W. Smith. 1970. Geographic variation in the pickerel frog. Herpetologica 26(2):240-254.

Schmidt, Karl P. 1953. A check list of North American amphibians and reptiles. Sixth ed. Amer. Soc. Ichthyol. Herpetol. viii+280 p.

Smith, Philip W. 1961. The amphibians and reptiles of Illinois. Bull. Illinois Nat. Hist. Surv. 28:1-298.

Sweet, Samuel S. 1960. An aggregation of hibernating amphibians. Bull. Philadelphia Herp. Soc. 8(2):11

Walker, Charles F. 1946. The amphibians of Ohio. Part I. The Frogs and Toads (Order Salienta). Ohio State Mus. Sci. Bull. 1(3):1-102.

Wright, Albert Hazen, and Anna Allen Wright. 1949. Handbook of frogs and toads of the United States and Canada. 3rd ed. Comstock Publ. Co., Ithaca, N.Y. xii+640 p.

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