Current Courses Teaching Philosophy CV


Wynn W. Gadkar-Wilcox

Associate Professor and Interim Chair

Department of History and Non-Western Cultures

Western Connecticut State University

Warner Hall 221

181 White Street

Danbury, CT 06810

Office Phone: (203) 837-8565 Fax: (203) 837-8905 email: wilcoxw@wcsu.edu

 

 


Course Schedule for Fall 2013:

NWC 110  Vietnamese Culture

HIS 450     Historiography

 

Office Hours for Fall 2013:

 Mondays and Wednesdays,12:00-1:00 and 4:30-5:30

Fridays, 10:30-11:30

(I also hold irregular office hours--meaning that I'm frequently but not always here--on Tuesday afternoons, usually between 4:30 and 6:30).

 

Education:

BA with high honors and highest distinction in general scholarship, UC Berkeley, 1997

MA, Southeast Asian History, Cornell, 2000

PhD, Southeast Asian History, Cornell, 2002.

 

Teaching Interests:

History and Culture of Mainland Southeast Asia, especially Vietnam

Chinese History

Historiography and Intellectual History

 

Research Interests:

I'm interested in Southeast Asian, especially Vietnamese, historiography and intellectual history.  I am particularly interested in how history is used as a tool to reaffirm political or social ideologies.  My recent book, Allegories of the Vietnamese Past (Yale Southeast Asia Studies, 2011), examines how contemporary historians have used eighteenth and nineteenth century events in Vietnamese history as justifications for their twentieth century ideologies.

 

I am beginning research on the 1862, 1868 and 1877 palace examinations held by the Nguyễn dynasty as a source of information about intellectual divisions in Vietnam in the nineteenth century, particularly in regard to how to respond to French aggression.

 

Selected Recent Publications:

 

Allegories of the Vietnamese Past: Unification and the Production of a modern historical identity.  New Haven, CT: Yale SEAS, 2011.

 

Editor, Vietnam and the West: New Perspectives.  Ithaca, NY: Cornell Southeast Asia Program Publications, 2010.

 

"An Ambiguous Relationship: Impressions of the United States in Vietnamese Historical Scholarship, 1986–2009," World History Connected 7:3 (October 2010).

 

“Women, Westernization, and the Origins of Modern Vietnamese Theatre,” Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 37:2 (June 2006), 205-224.

 

 “Transnationalism and Multiethnicity in the Early Gia Long Era,” in Nhung Tuyet Tran and Anthony Reid, Vietnam: Borderless Histories.  (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2006), 194-218.

 

“Women and Mythology in Vietnamese History,” positions: east asia cultures critique 13:2 (Fall 2005), 411-439.

 

 

 

Main page last updated July 19, 2013